Uncategorized

Taking Care of Yourself After Oral Surgery

Patients are often in for a surprise after oral surgery. Sometimes people go into a wisdom tooth extraction or dental implant placement thinking they will feel similar to how they feel after a dental procedure. It can be a rude awakening when post-operative pain and swelling prevent you from jumping back into your routine as fast as you would after a root canal! Make no mistake, oral surgery is surgery. Whether you are getting a sinus lift, bone grafting, dental implant, or multiple tooth extractions–the process involves cutting and suturing the oral tissues—and this is far more traumatic to the body than a filling or root canal. One of the most important things you can do to help yourself recover from oral surgery is arrange to take a few days off. Take time off work or find a caregiver who can help you if you look after small children. You will need to sleep, rest, sleep, and then rest some more!

The Day of Surgery

On the day of your surgery, follow all presurgical directions you have been given by your doctor. These will help us ensure that your anesthesia and surgical procedure are as predictable and safe as possible.

After your surgery, you will still feel the effects of the medications we have administered, and you may be in a bit of a fog. You may think, “this isn’t so bad” because the anesthetics and painkilling medications will prevent you from feeling the full extent of the post-operative sensitivity. Despite perhaps not feeling terrible pain, you should do your best to avoid using your mouth. We recommend sleeping as much as possible at first, since the first 24 hours after surgery are critical to initiating the healing process. For example, with wisdom teeth extractions, the blood needs to clot in your sockets, otherwise you may wind up with a painful condition called dry sockets. In order to avoid this, you should avoid creating any suction in the mouth. This means you should avoid sucking through a straw, spitting, swishing, (and don’t even think about smoking or vaping). This can be hard if you are constantly trying to drink, speak, and carry on as usual. Instead, grab a towel to catch your saliva, find a comfortable couch, and lie down.

Do not try to resume your usual diet or oral hygiene routine on the same day as your surgery. When you get hungry, consume only soft foods that don’t require chewing. Skip brushing your teeth, and instead rinse the mouth gently with warm salt water. This will help reduce swelling and clean any soft food residue from the mouth.

The Day After Surgery and Beyond

The first day after surgery will likely bring the full extent of your post-surgical pain. A day after your surgery, you will feel swelling, soreness, and pain at the site of your incisions. Use the painkillers prescribed or recommended by your doctor and cold packs to relieve the pain. Do not apply ice directly to the cheek or inside the mouth. Instead, use a cold pack with cloth around it, and apply it to the face in 15 minute intervals. Do not use heat, as this may intensify the pain.

You may experience some intermittent bleeding on and off in the first couple of days. This is normal, but flowing blood is not. Stanch the bleeding by biting down on sterile gauze or a moistened tea-bag for a few minutes. If you experience new bleeding that doesn’t stop, call your doctor for advice.

Again, you want to continue to avoid normal foods for up to a week. Consider your return to a normal diet as a slow, incremental process. Start with only liquids and pureed foods, and gradually add more soft foods, a little at a time. When you get back to brushing and flossing your teeth, take care not to agitate or poke at your surgical site. Swishing with water should be the main way you keep food and drink residue off your stitches. If you have concerns about oral hygiene, bring them up when you go back to your surgeon for your first post-operative appointment.

Getting Back into Your Routine

As with most surgeries, you’ll still be feeling the effects of your procedure when you start to return to your routine. You can try to go back to work or your normal home routines when you have the energy to do so, but continue to “baby” your surgical site and prepare special foods to make your life easier. If something doesn’t seem right, or if the pain does not gradually subsist, call your doctor and share your concerns. Any surgical procedure can be subject to complications, and all symptoms should be discussed with your doctor.

Uncategorized

Know about Different Types & Procedures of Dental Implants

Meant to replace tooth roots Dental Implants are special surgical procedures. They are placed in the jawbone and aren’t visible. Usually beneath the gums into the jawbone there’s a frame or metal post (Titanium) placed. The Titanium post is meant to stay there for long with proper treatment & precautions and, it dissolves with time.

In the past 10-years Dental clinics have received more of these cases. Reason being, Social Media has gained momentum in the last 10-years which means that in their respective social circles about their looks people are more conscious and worried. Therefore, to the new standards dentistry has adapted and to hide that missing / damaged teeth with artificial teeth dentists have developed multiple types of painless treatments and surgeries with dental implants in Windsor.

Types & Procedures

Based on 3 main types of indicators the classification’s done: implants size, type / head shape, and procedure.

Based on Procedure

Endosteal Implants – into the jawbone they are surgically implanted. To attach the post to the implant a second surgery’s done after the gum tissue healing. Ultimately, with dental bridges or artificial teeth the post’s attached. For 2-stage implants Endosteal is most commonly used.

Sub periosteal Implants – under the gum they’re placed but above or on the jawbone. On patients who do not want to go through a surgical procedure and have a shallow jawbone this is typically used.

Single-Stage – into the jaw it involves placing a long implant. The tissue is stitched after its top is first levelled with the gum tissue. The implant head is left visible. Then, without a minor surgery which exposes the head the temporary / abutment restoration would be attached after several months. To make sure that healing process goes smoothly extra precautions shall definitely be taken.

Two-Stage – used in the practice this is the most common method. In the jawbone that lies with bone under the gum the implant’s placed. For protection the gum tissue would be closed (stitched) after this. The surrounding bone then fuses and heals into it. Followed by abutment attachment, a second minor surgery would be performed after a small healing period.

On head type

Internal Hex Connector – This is another hexagonal shape connector. Into which the artificial teeth’s screwed they are an opening in the head. Dental Fillings are used.

External Hex Connector – This is a Hexagon shaped connector Placed on top of implant head.

Internal Octagon Connector – in the head it has an opening into which the restorations screwed and is shaped like an Octagon.

Based on Size

Standard Platform – These ranges from 3.5mm to 4.2mm in diameter are placed in the front part of the mouth.

Wide Platform – To replace the molars in the back of the mouth they are usually placed Ranging from 4.5mm to 6 mm in diameter.

Narrow/Mini Platform – with insufficient bone density this platform favors patients. To fit a regular size implant favour mini platforms patients who do not have space between their teeth roots. From 2mm to 3.5mm in diameter they range.

With the knowledge of this surgery Oral surgeons and Periodontist are perfectly equipped. To practice the techniques currently general dentists are learning the tips and tricks as this field is so popular. As looks are a major part of people’s social lives this field would always remain popular.

Uncategorized

Pull Your Tooth or Save It? Which is Best?

When your tooth is infected or diseased, it may seem like pulling it is the easy choice, especially if you’re in pain. But not so fast! Having that tooth pulled  may be the easy choice, but it may not be the best choice. Most people are unaware of the benefits of saving your natural teeth. The choice to pull your tooth or save it is ultimately yours to make, but make sure you know all the facts before making that big decision.

Pull Your Tooth or Save It: Benefits of Saving Your Tooth

What exactly are the benefits of saving your teeth? We turned to the experts, endodontists – dental specialists who focus on saving natural teeth, for answers.

  • Natural teeth are stronger. Natural teeth are stronger, function better than artificial ones, and are easiesr to care for. While technology and materials are better than ever, fabricated teeth still don’t have the same strength that natural teeth do.
  • Avoid shifting of teeth. When a tooth is pulled, it creates a gap in your smile, allowing the surrounding teeth to shift. This shifting takes time and can  eventually cause problems with chewing and bite alignment. These problems  can create a domino effect of pain, poor nutrition, and reduced quality of life.
  • Maintain your youthful appearance. When teeth are pulled, the roots that support the jaw are pulled as well. When there is a gap in the bone, the surrounding bone will collapse in often making people appear older than they are.
  • No loss of confidence. If the tooth to be pulled is visible when you smile, the resulting gap can have a negative impact on your self-confidence. Time and again we see patients who have lost their joyful smile because they are embarrassed about their teeth.
  • Less pain. After a tooth is pulled, most patients report several more days of pain, especially if they experience dry socket. When the tooth remains in place through a root canal, the pain is addressed immediately when the infection is eliminated, and there is no chance of dry socket.
  • Fewer visits to the dentist. After a tooth has been pulled, a dentist may consider a crown, implant, bridge or other dental device to eliminate the problem of shifting teeth. This can mean more dental visits, more expense, and sometimes more pain.
  • Fewer costs.  While you may think that pulling a tooth is cheaper than fixing it, the truth is that replacing the tooth costs more time and money. And choosing to not replace it will likely have physical and emotional costs.

Pull Your Tooth or Save It: How to Save a Tooth

There are many compelling reasons to hang on to your natural teeth for as long as you can. But decay and infection can make that a challenge and force you to decide to pull your tooth or save it. The answer is usually a root canal, a procedure where the inside of a tooth is cleaned and disinfected to remove the inflamed or infected interior pulp. Once the interior of the tooth is clean, the natural tooth is filled with a substance for strength and protected or restored with a crown, making it function again like any other tooth.

Not only do you save your natural tooth, a root canal eliminates the pain and the recovery time is very brief.

Pull Your Tooth or Save It: When to Have it Extracted

While it is always preferable to save a tooth, there are times when extraction is a better option. When a tooth is cracked, especially if it is cracked below the gumline, or in several places, an extraction may be required.  If the tooth is too weak to be restored, it may also be best to have it  pulled.

Uncategorized

How Often Should I Replace My Toothbrush?

When was the last time you replaced your toothbrush? We throw out expired foods, restock vitamins and supplements, and replace our beauty products often, but when it comes to health and beauty, it’s our dental hygiene that doesn’t get as much attention or thought as other areas of our regimen. However, there are important rules and tips you should follow for maintaining optimal dental health.

When To Change Your Toothbrush

Most dentists, and the American Dental Association (ADA), recommend changing your toothbrush every 3 months. Overtime, toothbrushes go through normal wear and tear and become less effective with removing plaque from teeth and gums. Studies have found that around 3 months is when the bristles break down and lose effectiveness.

One other consideration we don’t typically think about (and probably don’t like to think about) is that germs can hide and build up in toothbrush bristles. This makes it important to replace your toothbrush after you’ve had a cold, or risk possible reinfection.

Fungus and bacteria can also develop in the bristles if not taken care of properly. After use, make sure you rinse off and dry your toothbrush thoroughly, storing uncovered in an upright position and keeping it away from other used toothbrushes. When traveling, be sure to cover your toothbrush head to protect it and reduce the spread of germs.

If you can’t remember exactly how long it’s been, pay particular attention to the condition your toothbrush head is in – whether the bristles are worn out, fan out, or frayed, or especially if you see dark color changes, which is a sign of mold.

What Happens If I Don’t Change My Toothbrush Often Enough?

If knowing that bacteria and fungus accumulates on your toothbrush bristles overtime isn’t enough reason to replace your toothbrush more often, there are also a number of other risks and uninviting issues involved with not replacing your toothbrush. One risk includes damaging your gums, as old toothbrushes become ineffective with removing plaque from your teeth, which leads to gingivitis. Left untreated, gingivitis leads to infection, which can cause teeth to fall out.

Even more unappealing, you can get sick from overused toothbrushes (see: bacteria and fungus build up), your toothbrush can grow mold, or possibly the least appealing, you can ingest unwanted particles if stored near a toilet.

I don’t know about you, but I’m going to go change my toothbrush right now and schedule a deep cleaning with my dentist.

What To Consider When Shopping for Dental Products

Ask your dentist during your next dental checkup and cleaning for recommendations about what you should be buying based off your individual needs, your particular dental health state, etc.

Some common suggestions among dental professionals are to look for toothbrushes with soft bristles, as hard bristles damage your teeth and gums, choose a toothbrush head size that touches one or two teeth at a time, use a toothpaste containing fluoride approved by the ADA, consider using mouthwash to further fight plaque and gingivitis, and don’t forget floss!

Consider investing in an electric toothbrush, as these have been proven to improve oral health beyond what a manual toothbrush can do by removing plaque, reducing gingivitis and eliminating teeth staining. They’ve also been shown to minimize the amount of plaque on the teeth of people with periodontal disease.

Do your research on what products fit your needs best, and don’t forget to ask your dentist for recommendations.

Uncategorized

Say Ahhhh – What Your Tongue Can Tell You About Your Health

Cropped close up photo beautiful amazing she her dark skin lady beaming whitening toothy smile tongue out perfect mouth wear casual white t-shirt isolated yellow bright vibrant background.

Our tongue, it’s one of those things we all take for granted! As children we explored the world with our tongues, licking everything in sight (much to our mother’s dismay) and sticking it out at our siblings and parents just to get their reaction. As young adults we learned there was more to our tongue while exploring our first kisses and exotic foods.

But the tongue is more than just a random body part, our tongues play a key role in our ability to taste and swallow food. And believe it or not, your tongue can also provide your dentist with clues to both your oral health and your overall health.  In fact, you might be surprised what your tongue can tell you about your health. Get ready to say, “Ahhhhhhh!”

What Your Tongue Can Tell You About Your Health

White Coating on Tongue
Your tongue is supposed to be a lovely shade of pink. If parts of your tongue appear to be coated with a white substance, this could be oral thrush, a yeast overgrowth that occurs inside the oral cavity. Of course, it could just be whitish from not brushing your tongue every time you brush your teeth. You do that, don’t you? If the white brushes away, you’re good to go.

White Patches on Tongue
Leukoplakia is a condition that can happen if the tongue has been irritated, such as with smoking or tobacco use. Every medical professional will advise you to quit that tobacco habit, but it’s ultimately up to you. If you see white patches, though, book a dentist appointment to be on the safe side and to rule out oral cancer.

Overly Red Tongue
While an overly red tongue can be a symptom of a Kawasaki disease, it’s much more commonly associated with a vitamin deficiency, such as folic acid or B-12. The solution could be simply adding a vitamin supplement to your morning smoothie. That’s not so bad, right?

Irregular Red Bumpy Patches
If your tongue looks like a roughly drawn map of irregular red and bumpy patches, this isn’t a fortune-teller sign that you’ll be going on a trip soon. You might be suffering from a high fever, in which case, taking a long journey overseas is the last thing you should be doing!

Tender, Sore Tongue
If your tongue is overly sensitive in one spot or all over, you could have a food allergy or a developing canker sore. Don’t worry about it, unless it doesn’t go away for a time. After that, time to call in the dentist for a professional opinion!

Hairy Tongue
Yep, sounds strange, but sometimes a protein build-up can cause small bumps to become elongated trapping food resulting in what looks like strands of hair on your tongue. Usually a good brushing or tongue scraping will take care of it, but if it doesn’t, a trip to the dentist is in order.

Your dentist is the first line of defense against both serious and benign health concerns. So, stick out your tongue at the dentist and be ready for a comprehensive oral checkup. You never know what your tongue might be telling you about your health!